ICANN-320Dominated by U.S and Europe. Don't flame me; I supported the ICANN transition.  I also am aware of the limitations of ICANN that are generally ignored. In particular, some who know better called this a victory of the global Internet community. 

Unfortunately, this isn't true. 
 
The global Internet community is not represented in ICANN in a meaningful form. The Board and the staff they appoint make essentially all the decisions. ICANN is a model of community participation in discussion, a good thing. But a close look at the detailed process shows the community neither makes decisions or chooses those who do. An early process of elected members was shut down.
 
One-third of the Internet - Mainland China - is not represented. According to ICANN CEO Fadi Chehadi, they could not be represented while NTIA had control. In addition, the board members are European, American, or mostly in sympathy.  (I have traced the ties of the handful from the global South.)
 
The majority of Internet users are not in the countries well represented in ICANN. The gap is growing rapidly.
Around late next year, Africans with 3G and 4G Internet connections will pass 320M, the U.S. population. The 4G revolution in India will very quickly add 200M more. China is already over 600M, as well as 270M with landline broadband, about as many as the U.S. and Western Europe combined. About 2/3rds of the world's Internet users have minimal representation in ICANN.
 
I take the position that effective Internet governance is impossible with half the Internet users excluded. I am not blind to the authoritarian nature of China and other regimes, but they are part of the world. We need a "Nixon goes to China" moment.
 
Unfortunately, the board is essentially self-perpetuating. Unless the board members choose to change things, ICANN does not represent the global Internet community.
 
The Internet Society has a $30M/year subsidy from dot org registrations. We can and should be the most powerful consumer advocates on the Internet. Accurate analysis is an important first step.  Dave

Internet Society congratulates global Internet community on successful IANA stewardship transition.

 
01 October 2016

The Internet Society Board of Trustees joins the Internet community in celebrating today’s historic milestone whereby the stewardship of the IANA functions will be transitioned to the global Internet community.

Today’s IANA stewardship transition fulfills a vision of multistakeholder governance set forth nearly 20 years ago. The work undertaken by the global Internet community to develop a robust, consensus proposal for the IANA stewardship transition demonstrates the legitimacy of the collaborative approach to governing critical Internet resources. By allowing its contract with ICANN regarding IANA oversight to expire, the U.S. government has demonstrated its continued support for the multistakeholder model.

“Today’s outcome confirms the strength of both the community and the multistakeholder process in tackling issues important to the continued growth and evolution of the Internet,” said Gonzalo Camarillo, Chair of the Internet Society's Board of Trustees. “We commend the NTIA for its trust and confidence in the multistakeholder Internet community to achieve this important accomplishment.”

As an interested party to the transition, the Internet Society has been involved in the IANA stewardship transition since the U.S. Department of Commerce National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) announced its intention to withdraw from these core technical functions of the Internet in March 2014. Throughout the development of the plan, the Internet Society strongly supported the transition as the means to ensure the continued smooth operation of the global Internet.

“The expiration of the IANA contract is a remarkable testament to the persistence and courage by many individuals and organizations to do what is best for the Internet,” said Kathryn Brown, President and CEO of the Internet Society. “We look forward to working with ICANN to implement the processes set out in the proposal to ensure its success. We are confident that, working with (and through) ICANN, the Internet community is committed and prepared to carry out stewardship of the IANA functions in an open, inclusive, transparent and accountable manner.”

The IANA transition is a powerful illustration of the multistakeholder model and an affirmation of the principle that the best approach to address challenges is through bottom-up, transparent, and consensus-driven processes. To fulfill our shared vision of a global Internet of opportunity, the multistakeholder community must apply the same level of commitment to connecting the unconnected and strengthening global trust in the Internet. The Internet Society is fully committed to playing its part to ensure the Internet grows as a platform for innovation and collaboration.

Finally, the Board of Trustees of the Internet Society would like to thank all those actively committed to this transition. In particular, the Board notes the significant contributions of the IANA Coordination Group, especially ISOC appointees Narelle Clark and Demi Getschko.

 

Steve Crocker | Chair

Selected by: Nominating Committee

Term: November 2008 – Annual General Meeting 2017

Committees:

Cherine Chalaby

Cherine Chalaby | Vice Chair

Selected by: Nominating Committee

Term: December 2010 – Annual General Meeting 2016

Committees:

Rinalia Abdul Rahim

Rinalia Abdul
Rahim

Selected by: At-Large

Term: October 2014 – Annual General Meeting 2017

Committees:

Ron da Silva

Ron da Silva

Selected by: ASO

Term: October 2015 – Annual General Meeting 2018

Committees:

Chris Disspain

Chris Disspain

Selected by: ccNSO

Term: June 2011 – Annual General Meeting 2017

Committees:

Asha Hemrajani

Asha Hemrajani

Selected by: Nominating Committee

Term: October 2014 – Annual General Meeting 2017

Committees:

Rafael Lito Ibarra

Rafael Lito Ibarra

Selected by: Nominating Committee

Term: October 2015 – Annual General Meeting 2018

Committees:

Markus Kummer

Markus Kummer

Selected by: GNSO

Term: October 2014 – Annual General Meeting 2017

Committees:

Bruno Lanvin

Bruno Lanvin

Selected by: Nominating Committee

Term: November 2013 – Annual General Meeting 2016

Committees:

Erika Mann

Erika Mann

Selected by: Nominating Committee

Term: December 2010 – Annual General Meeting 2016

Committees:

Göran Marby

Göran Marby | President & CEO

 

Ram Mohan

Ram Mohan

SSAC Liaison Since 2008

Committees:

George Sadowsky

George
Sadowsky

Selected by: Nominating Committee

Term: October 2009 – Annual General Meeting 2018

Committees:

 

Thomas Schneider

Thomas
Schneider

GAC Liaison

Term: First GAC Meeting 2015 – First GAC Meeting 2017

Committees:

Mike Silber

Mike Silber

Selected by: ccNSO

Term: May 2009 – Annual General Meeting 2018

Committees:

 

Jonne Soininen

Jonne Soininen

IETF Liaison

Term: 2013 – Annual General Meeting 2017

Committees:

  • Risk | Non-Voting Member
Bruce Tonkin

Bruce Tonkin

Selected by: GNSO

Term: June 2007 – Annual General Meeting 2016

Committees:

Lousewies van der Laan

Lousewies
van der Laan

Selected by: Nominating Committee

Term: October 2015 – Annual General Meeting 2018

Committees:

Suzanne Woolf

Suzanne Woolf

RSSAC Liaison Since 2004

Committees:

Kuo-Wei Wu

Kuo-Wei Wu

Selected by ASO

Term: April 2010 – Annual General Meeting 2016

Committees:

The world needs a good news source on Internet and telecom policy. I hope to create one. Catch a mistake? Email me please.  Dave Burstein